The Mercurial Marriage of Fiction and Film

The Mercurial Marriage of Fiction and Film

The Mercurial Marriage of Fiction and Film

Friday, April 1, 2016
3:00 pm to 4:15 pm
Room 515 A, LA Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

What kinds of narrative fiction and nonfiction publications best lend themselves to filmed adaptation?

Billy Mernit (moderator) screenwriter, author and story analyst for Universal Pictures.
Chris Balis, screenwriter whose credits include Asylum, the film adaption from the Patrick McGrath novel.
Nancy Nigrosh has represented many award winning writers, directors and actors, including Academy Award–winner Kathryn Bigelow, as well as brokering film and television rights for authors; among them, Amanda Brown (“Legally Blonde”) and Jodi Picoult.
Michael Weiss is a screenwriter, and former VP of production for Miramax Films whose screenplays include Journey to the Center of the Earth, Around the World in 80 Days, and The Scorpion King.

More info: https://www.awpwriter.org/awp_conference/event_detail/6036

How to Have a Professional Writing Career for Authors & Screenwriters

How to Have a Professional Writing Career for Authors & Screenwriters

February 11-14, 2016
UCLA Extension Writers’ Program
Westwood campus

This Writers Studio workshop offers rare insight into any aspiring writer’s most burning question: “How do I get an agent?” The answer to this question involves acquiring a strong grasp of what a professional partnership with a literary agent entails and the realization that without representation, creative writers and screenwriters lack the most meaningful access they’ll need, to have to a professional writing career.

More Info

For enrollment information please contact Chae Ko, Writers’ Program Representative (310) 206-2612

For inquires about future courses please contact writers@uclaextension.edu

Neutralizing the Matilda Effect: How Women Writers Can Forge Successful Writing Careers

Neutralizing the Matilda Effect: How Women Writers Can Forge Successful Writing Careers

October 3 – December 12, 2015
Saturdays 10am – 1pm
UCLA Extension Writers’ Program
Downtown Los Angeles, 101B Figueroa Courtyard

Designed for women creative writers and screenwriters with serious professional aspirations, this course unpacks strategies and solutions to counter the prevailing bias in favor of men’s innate ability to self-generate prominence, known as The Matthew Effect. The course goal is for you to learn how to level the playing field by preparing yourself for the realities of the writing career game and engage in it actively, decisively, and successfully.

More Info

For enrollment information please contact Katy Flaherty, Program Representative, Creative Writing (310) 206-0951

A Dream Client: She Yearned To Go Pro And She Did!

A Dream Client: She Yearned To Go Pro And She Did!

Hollywood code is universally understandable, but not everybody can adapt to it. Fluency is relative to aptitude. Cinderella could go to the ball because not only did she look the part, she played it, because that’s who she truly was – a heroine not a victim. In other words, Cinderella went “pro”.

Did she bring her childhood trauma with her to the ballroom? Did she mention all her prior hardships and lack of opportunities? Was she intimidated or distracted or critical when her stepfamily showed up at the ball? Think about the way she expresses herself – in a situation she’s never been in before, in a privileged world where she has no place. Yet, telepathically, she knows the appropriate, coded behavior.

Hollywood code is very often non-verbal on the one hand, then ultra verbal on the other. A typical discourse isn’t just about expressing literary knowledge that is skills and rules based, but laden with opportunity to openly validate any experience-driven understanding of the meaning inside that knowledge. In Hollywood, ‘meaning’ is a technical and industrial term that refers to the meaning of life…regardless of genre… even in silliest comedic terms. Subsequently, patterns of interactive role-playing are deeply institutionalized in those still standing corridors of Hollywood power master scribe William Goldman talked about. Those corridors may be more accessible than you might think…entre is all about your focused ability to adapt while staying authentically yourself…like Cinderella.

Ask A Literary Agent

If You Want Screenwriting Career Tips, Ask A Literary Agent

I ask every class I teach: “What does an agent do?” And wait. There’s silence until someone finally volunteers. Typically it goes like this:

“They make calls.”

“They make deals.”

“They’re gatekeepers.

Many people seem to think of agents and writers as being in some form of doctor/patient relationship — a dreaded necessity due to an illness or injury that requires professional intervention. It seems to be a lot easier to trust a clinician’s skills than your average literary agents. Not so with managers, who generally receive a hearty thumbs-up. “They really care about you” is the comfort meme, while the conventional sentiment “agents only care about the deal” won’t go away.  

All the managers I know personally or professionally care just as much as the agent and the client about the deal. Managers also care about the essential role agents play. Yet, unless that manager was once an agent, even the manager often considers (along with the client) the literary agent’s playbook to be as mysterious as a magician’s hat. Everybody knows for certain that lit agents zero in on high-profile media buyers in order to broker high-end intellectual properties. While they’re hanging out in the media-marketplace, they can also secure gainful literary employment for their clients. But no one is exactly sure how they do it. It would take several hundred pages to explain how and why literary agents do what they do. 

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